Four places that you must see when visiting Jordan

Published: 14th August 2007
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If it's your first time or tenth time visiting Jordan there are four places that must be seen while visiting. Jordan offers many attractions to the person looking for history, religion or just night life. You must decide ahead of time on what you want to do in Jordan ahead of time or you will get distracted for all the activities. There are hundreds of places to visit while in Jordan but I have narrowed your them down to four places that you must visit while in Jordan.



The first is Petra, which was recently voted as one of the new seven wonders of the world. Petra is an archaeological site in Jordan, lying in a basin among the mountains which form the eastern flank of Arabah (Wadi Araba), the large valley running from the Dead Sea to the Gulf of Aqaba. It is famous for having many stone structures carved into the rock. The long-hidden site was revealed to the Western world by the Swiss explorer Johann Ludwig Burckhardt in 1812. It was famously described as "a rose-red city half as old as time" in a Newdigate prize-winning sonnet by John William Burgon. Burgon had not actually visited Petra, which remained accessible only to Europeans accompanied by local guides with armed escorts until after World War I. The site was designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1985 when it was described as "one of the most precious cultural properties of man's cultural heritage."



The second is the Dead Sea, The Dead Sea is a salt lake between the West Bank and Israel to the west, and Jordan to the east. It is said to be the lowest point on Earth, at 420 m (1,378 feet) below sea level;[2] its shores are actually the lowest point on dry land, as there are deeper points on Earth under water or ice. At 330m deep (1,083 feet), the Dead Sea is the deepest hyper saline lake in the world. It is also the world's second saltiest body of water, after Lake Asal in Djibouti. With 30 percent salinity, it is 8.6 times saltier than the ocean [3]. Israeli experts say it is nine times saltier than the Mediterranean Sea (31.5% salt versus 3.5% for the Mediterranean). The Dead Sea is 67 km (42 miles) long and 18 km (11 miles) wide at its widest point. It lies in the Jordan Rift Valley, and its main tributary is the Jordan River.

The Dead Sea has attracted visitors from around the Mediterranean basin for thousands of years. Biblically, it was a place of refuge for King David. It was one of the world's first health resorts (for Herod the Great), and it has been the supplier of a wide variety of products, from balms for Egyptian mummification to potash for fertilizers.



The third is Wadi Rum, Wadi Rum is a valley cut into the sandstone and granite rock in southwest Jordan. It is the largest wadi in Jordan. The name Rum most likely comes from an Aramaic root meaning 'high' or 'elevated'. To reflect its Arabic pronunciation properly, archaeologists transcribe the name Wadi Ramm. The area is now also one of Jordan's important tourist destinations, and attracts an increasing number of foreign tourists. In contrast, local or Arab tourists are almost none-existing. Popular activities in the desert environment include camping under the stars, riding Arab horses, hiking and rock-climbing amongst the massive rock formations. Jabal Rum (1754 metres above sea level) is the highest peak in the area, and the second-highest peak in Jordan. On a clear day, it is possible to see the Red Sea and the Saudi border from the top.

The influx of tourists to this once isolated area has substantially increased the financial fortunes of the Bedouin people, and it is not uncommon to see locals using mobile phones and driving expensive four-wheel drive vehicles.



The village of Wadi Rum consists of several hundred Bedouin inhabitants with their goat-hair tents and concrete houses, a school, a few shops, and the headquarters of the Desert Patrol.



The fourth is Jerash. Jerash is the capital of Jerash Governorate near to Ajlun in Jordan. The total population of the city and the nearby villages exceeds 120,000 people. Jerash is situated in the north of Jordan, 45km north of the capital Amman. Jerash Governorate's geographical features varies from cold mountains to fertile valleys from (300 to 1100 Meters above the sea level), suitable for growing a wide variety of agricultural crops. Jerash is known for the ruins of the Greco-Roman city of Gerasa, also referred to as Antioch on the Golden River. It is sometimes misleadingly referred to as the "Pompeii of the Middle East or Asia", referring to its size, extent of excavation and level of preservation (though Jerash was never buried by a volcano). Jerash is considered one of the most important and best preserved Roman cities in the Near East. It was a city of the Decapolis.



Like I said there hundreds of other places to visit in Jordan like the baptism site, Mount Nebo, Aqaba but these 4 are must when visiting Jordan.



If you are planning to travel to Jordan you can check out Jordan Travel who specialize in Travel to Jordan at http://www.jordantravelpackges.com.


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